Lot 946. AN IMPORTANT CORK MODEL OF THE GREEK TEMPLE OF NEPTUNE

AN IMPORTANT CORK MODEL OF THE GREEK TEMPLE OF NEPTUNE
at Paestum attributed to Domenico Padiglione, with exceptionally fine detail including fallen masonry around the perimeter, on an ebonised plinth, 26" x 11.75" x 7.5" high, on an oak plinth with a glazed case, 30.5" wide x 15.75" high overall. See illustration
Provenance: This exceptional cork model was probably acquired by the Great Great Grandfather of the vendor, Edward Dawson (1802-1859) of Launde Abbey, Leicestershire.
It is believed that Dawson acquired the model on the Grand Tour during the 1820's. Although the creator cannot be identified with certainty, there is a hint in the diary of another person who made the Grand Tour at about the same time, Richard Grenville, the First Duke of Buckingham and Chandos. In his diary, the Duke recalls dining in the ruins of the Temple of Neptune at Paestum on 13th May 1828 and meeting the local priest, whom he describes as "the real Cicerone of the place" and "a well-informed man". The diary continues: "He makes models in cork of the buildings, of singular beauty and correctness". (The private diary of Richard, Duke of Buckingham and Chandos, vol. II, published by Hurst & Blackett, 1862). This episode is referred to and the model is illustrated in a recent book about the Duke's voyage ("No Ordinary Tourist" by Jonathon Roberts and Gerard Morgan-Grenville, Milton Mill Publishing, 2006, pg. 139). A comparable model of the Temple of Neptune at Paestum by Domenico Padiglione is in Sir John Soane's Museum, Lincoln's Inn Fields, London. Padiglione made models of all three temples in Paestum for the Naples Museum around 1805. These post-date the excavations and restorations of the temples which began in 1802, during which large quantities of accumulated fragments were removed from within the temples. His models remained on view at the Naples Museum until the 1840's. He made numerous copies for private sale, despite the fact that his contract with the Museum forbade him from doing so. The three models in Sir John Soane's collection were probably made in the 1820's. The original inventories of the Soane Museum collection state that they were acquired from his pupil, John Sanders, circa 1826.
Sold For £33000.00 In The Silver, Jewellery and Furniture - Sale Date 3rd December 2015

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